the entitlement case

whilst my daily procrastination yesterday, i stumbled upon an interesting article that sang to my overly-ambitious core – 3 Ways to Become An Authoritative Leader, EVEN If You’re Under 30.

a common misconception of the young and successful is that we feel entitled. to everything. always.

don’t get me wrong, i am aware that there are members of my generation afflicted by the instant-gratification bug, but i also think there is a strong lot of us that know what it means to work and work hard, that know what it means to climb up the ladder rung by rung, and that know that while some people grow into leaders, others are just born with it (here’s hoping).

the article paints a pretty picture: follow three steps of corporate-social-climbing etiquette (establish yourself at both your company/community, and use your previous experience) you will be given the respect you undoubtedly deserve.

hmm. well that’s nice, but DUH.

it’s as if the article simply expanded on the adage “work hard and you will go far.”

well, thank you sherlock.

the key point the article fails to mention is that amongst all the do-goodery and letting-hard-work-pave the-way, one must learn the delicate art of informed bullshit.

as a young person, we, by default, simply don’t have as much in the way of direct experience as our superiors, so it is of the upmost importance to stand proud and commandeer the moment/meeting/phone call into something you can make work for you.

from there it is up to you to actually learn the truth behind your blasphemy and then of course rely on judgement and intuition to pull you the rest of the way.

so forgive me, if that comes across as entitled, it’s just that i learned a valuable lesson at a young age: hard work with a side of well-informed bullshit, that’s leadership magic.

and well if you can’t pull those things together, enjoy middle-management and i’ll be waving from my fully-entitled bullshit-built tower.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s